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Magor

Magor
Adan
Biographical Information
TitlesChieftain of the Third House of the Edain
LanguageMannish dialect
BirthF.A. 341
Deathunknown (aged 24+)
Family
HouseHouse of Marach
ParentageMalach Aradan & Zimrahin Meldis
SiblingsAdanel
SpouseUnnamed
ChildrenHathol
Physical Description
GenderMale

Magor was Malach's youngest child and only son, and Magor in turn was the father of Hathol.

[edit] History

He was born in F.A. 341. He served no Elf-lord. Furthermore, Magor had only one sister: Adanel, who was elder to him.[1]

He led a part of his father's people away from Hithlum and southward down the River Sirion. They settled among the southern foothills of the Ered Wethrin,[2] near the sources of river Teiglin.[1]

Magor's grandson Hador and his people returned over the mountains and entered the service of the Elven Noldorin High-king Fingolfin, and Magor's grandson was soon made Lord of Dor-lómin. From Magor's famous grandson his people took Hador's name and re-named the House of Marach to the House of Hador.[2]

[edit] Etymology

Magor means "the Swordsman" in Sindarin.[1]

[edit] Genealogy

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Marach
F.A. 282 - 376
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Zimrahin
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
Malach
307 - 398
 
Imlach
b. 310
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Belemir
b. 339
 
Adanel
b. 339
 
 
 
 
 
MAGOR
b. 341
 
Amlach
b. 337
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beren
b. 374
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hathol
b. 365
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
children
 
Emeldir
b. 406
 
Barahir
400 - 460
 
Hador
390 - 455
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beren
432 - 503
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Two. The Later Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Coming of Men into the West (Chapter 14)", Commentary, (ii) House of Hador, pp. 234-235
  2. 2.0 2.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Coming of Men into the West"