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Tevildo

Tevildo
Cat
Alan Lee - Tevildo and Tinúviel.jpg
"Tevildo and Tinúviel" by Alan Lee
Biographical Information
Other namesTifil/Tiberth (G)
AffiliationMelko
Physical Description
RaceCat
GenderMale
GalleryImages of Tevildo

Tevildo, or the "Prince of Cats", was a servant of Melko according to the early version of the legendarium in The Book of Lost Tales.

Contents

History

He was an evil fay in the form of a great black cat with a collar of gold, which gave him much of his evil power. He was considered a prince of the servants of Melko and lived in a hilltop castle near Angamandi with other tiger-size cats. During the Quest for the Silmaril, Beren was captured by Melko and forced to work in Tevildo's kitchens. However, the cat was defeated by his archenemy Huan and Tinúviel, who forced him to give up his collar and reveal the spell which held the stones of his castle together. Melko learned Tevildo had lost his power and the cats reduced to normal size and exiled them.

Later Tevildo's place in the narrative was replaced by that of the Necromancer, Thû (later renamed Sauron), in the later Legendarium. Thû (and later Sauron) was the "Lord of Werewolves", in contrast to Tevildo's position as "Prince of Cats"; the cat-versus-dog theme prominent in the "Tale of Tinúviel" was thus eliminated in later writings.[1]

Etymology

Tevildo is Qenya. Although it is not given a literal translation, it is said to derive from the root TEFE related with "hate" or "hatred". His Gnomish name is Tifil.[2] This Gnomish name was later changed to Tiberth; and he was given the titles Vardo Meoita in Qenya and Bridhon Miaugion in Gnomish, both meaning "Prince of Cats".[3]

Inspiration

Tevildo resembles in form the name Tybalt from William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, who also has the title of "Prince of Cats".

Also note worthy is Cath Palug, a monstrous cat in Welsh legend. In some Arthurian stories there is also mentiones of a fight between King Arthur himself and a evil cat (that is some times named Cath Palug and sometimes unnamed). In some stories Arthur is victorious, but in others the king is killed by the cat.

See also

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "I. The Tale of Tinúviel"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, Appendix: Names in the Lost Tales – Part I, entry "Tevildo"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "Appendix: Names in the Lost Tales – Part II", entry "Tevildo"