Tolkien Gateway

Dol Amroth

The name Amroth refers to more than one character, item or concept. For a list of other meanings, see Amroth (disambiguation).
Dol Amroth
City
Jan Pospisil - Dol Amroth.jpg
"Dol Amroth" by Jan Pospíšil
General Information
LocationA headland on the western coasts of Belfalas in Gondor
TypeCity
DescriptionSeat of the Prince of Dol Amroth
People and History
InhabitantsPrimarily Gondorians (many Elves lived in the area for a time)
CreatedSettled by the mid-late Second Age[1]
EventsLoss of Amroth
GalleryImages of Dol Amroth

Dol Amroth was a promontory, ruled as a hereditary princedom from its stronghold, situated on a peninsula in Gondor facing the Bay of Belfalas.

The emblem of the Prince of Dol Amroth was a silver-upon-blue banner, bearing a ship with a swan-prow upon the sea.[2]

Contents

[edit] Description

Its northern shore defined part of Cobas Haven, the small bay into which the Morthond River flowed.[3] Upon the headland the Princes of Dol Amroth established a castle and thus Dol Amroth referred to this stronghold and to the neighbouring port-city, the chief city of the fief of Belfalas.[4] Within the walls of the city was the Sea-ward Tower or Tirith Aear,[5] which had a bell that was rung for the benefit of mariners.[6]

[edit] History

The first known settlers of Belfalas were Sindar refugees from Beleriand in the late First Age[7], and in the Second Age (after the War of the Elves and Sauron) the headland that would become Dol Amroth was settled by Galadriel and Celeborn; their company was increased by Elves from Lórinand.[8]

A noble Númenórean family of the Faithful settled in Belfalas and built a stronghold on the promontory. When the Realms in Exile were formed, Elendil gave their ruler the title of Prince, and his realm became known as Dor-en-Ernil.[1]

Amroth, the former King of Lórien, was lost in the Bay of Belfalas near the headland in T.A. 1981, and around that time the last Elves departed it. The promontory was now known as Dol Amroth, named as such after the lost King (the "Hill of Amroth").[8] The Númenóreans now occupied the city, which now probably belonged to Dor-en-Ernil,[9] and its first ruler became Galador.[1] Indeed, according to the tradition of his house, Galador's mother was Mithrellas, a Silvan Elf who had accompanied Amroth's beloved Nimrodel on her southward journey from Lórien.[1]

Being a coastal city, Dol Amroth was subject to occasional attacks by the Corsairs of Umbar for its fifteenth prince was slain in battle against these sea raiders in T.A. 2746.[10]

In all, there were twenty-one Princes of Dol Amroth before the twenty-second, Imrahil, led a company of knights and a contingent of 700 men from the city to Minas Tirith during the War of the Ring.[4]

[edit] Population

Princess of Dol Amroth by Ted Nasmith

The first known settlers of the promontory were Galadriel and Celeborn along with many Elves from Lórinand some time after S.A. 1701, apart from the Sindarin settlement north of Dol Amroth established in the late First Age. The Elves remained there until T.A. 1981.[7]

The Faithful family that had settled in Dol Amroth was said to be akin to Elendil[1] and, according to the legend of Mithrellas, their Princes had Elvish blood.[8][11] Because of this, the ruling house and their kin were noble by blood and fair in face and mind.[12]

In addition to the rulers of Dol Amroth, the people of Dol Amroth were also of high blood being tall, grey-eyed, proud, and dark-haired, indicative of their high Númenórean blood.[4] In fact, when Prince Imrahil arrived in Minas Tirith with his swan-knights, they "held themselves like lords in whom the race of Númenor ran true."[13] Being mostly Dúnedain of the South, the inhabitants of Dol Amroth were also some of the few people of Gondor who knew and spoke Sindarin on a daily basis.[14] They were famous as the most skilful harp players in all of Gondor, who played at the coronation of Aragorn.[15]

[edit] Etymology

Dol Amroth is Sindarin from dol ("hill") and the name of the King Amroth ("Upclimber"),[16] hence "Hill of Amroth".

[edit] Portrayal in adaptations

2014: The Lord of the Rings Online:

Dol Amroth was the largest city in the region of Western Gondor. It was ruled by Lothíriel in her father's absence. There were two gates to the city, one in the east leading to the waterfront and one in the west leading up to the city proper. The city was threatened by the Corsairs of Umbar, who blockaded the port and briefly managed to capture the city.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "Cirion and Eorl and the Friendship of Gondor and Rohan"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Field of Cormallen"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The West of Middle-earth at the End of the Third Age" [map]
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "Minas Tirith"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, "Preface"
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, "The Man in the Moon Came Down Too Soon"
  7. 7.0 7.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", "Amroth and Nimrodel"
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn"
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", "Amroth and Nimrodel", note 14
  10. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "VII. The Heirs of Elendil", The House of Dol Amroth, p. 222
  11. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Last Debate"
  12. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "VII. The Heirs of Elendil", p. 221
  13. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Siege of Gondor"
  14. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix F, "The Languages and Peoples of the Third Age", "Of Men"
  15. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Steward and the King"
  16. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", "Amroth and Nimrodel", p. 245