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==Inspiration==
 
==Inspiration==
 
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The One Ring may have been inspired by the [[Wikipedia:Ring of Silvianus|Ring of Silvianus]] and its inscribed curse. The hypothesis is based on Tolkien gaining knowledge about the Ring of Silvianus through the archaeologist [[Wikipedia:Mortimer Wheeler|Mortimer Wheeler]], for whom Tolkien wrote the text "[[The Name 'Nodens']]".<ref>{{webcite|author=|articleurl=http://www.lotrplaza.com/showthread.php?55657-A-Ring-with-a-Curse&p=563861#post563861|articlename=A Ring with a Curse|dated=|website=Plaza|accessed=10 April 2013}}</ref> However, Tolkien scholars [[Wayne G. Hammond]] and [[Christina Scull]] have pointed out that there is no "evidence, or good reason to believe, that Tolkien was inspired by the Roman ring".<ref>{{webcite|author=[[Wayne G. Hammond]], [[Christina Scull]]|articleurl=http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/mythsoc/conversations/topics/24198|articlename=Re:Tolkien and Nodens in the news this morning (message 24198)|dated=9 April 2013|website=Mythsoc|accessed=23 November 2013}}</ref>
Tolkien scholar [[John D. Rateliff]] has at length discussed five different rings of invisibility which occur in works that predate Tolkien's:
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*Plato's [[Wikipedia:Ring of Gyges|Ring of Gyges]] (ca. 390 BC),
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*the magic ring in [[Wikipedia:Chrétien de Troyes|Chrétien de Troyes]]' ''[[Wikipedia:Yvain, the Knight of the Lion|Yvain, the Knight of the Lion]]'' (ca. 1177);
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*[[Wikipedia:Angelica (character)|Angelica]]'s ring, of French Renaissance literature;
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*the Fairy's ring appearing in the tale "The Enchanted Ring" (by [[Wikipedia:François Fénelon|François Fénelon]]) in [[Wikipedia:Andrew Lang|Andrew Lang]]'s ''[[Wikipedia:Andrew Lang's Fairy Books|The Green Fairy Book]]'' (a collection of fairy-tales referred to by Tolkien in his [[On Fairy-Stories|Andrew Lang lecture]]);<ref group=note>The "Fairy's ring" was first noted by [[Douglas A. Anderson]]. Cf. {{HM|AH}}, p. 133.</ref>
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*the witch-maiden's ring in an Estonian folktale (ca. 1866) from the ''[[Wikipedia:Kalevipoeg|Kalevipoeg]]'', translated as "[[Wikipedia:The Dragon of the North|The Dragon of the North]]" in ''[[Wikipedia:Andrew Lang's Fairy Books|The Yellow Fairy Book]]'' (1894).
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Rateliff's proposes that the ring most likely to have provided an inspiration for Tolkien is a version of Chrétien's tale, namely Owein's ring in the [[Welsh]] ''[[Wikipedia:Three Welsh Romances#Owain, or the Lady of the Fountain|Owain, or the Lady of the Fountain]]''. He also regards the rings in Fénelon's and Plato's stories as possible influences, but concludes that: "''the primary influence on Frodo's ring is in fact'' The Hobbit ''itself: here, as so often, Tolkien is his own main source''".<ref>{{HM|HHO}}, pp. 176-182</ref>
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It has also been suggested that the One Ring may have been inspired by the [[Wikipedia:Ring of Silvianus|Ring of Silvianus]] and its inscribed curse. The hypothesis is based on Tolkien gaining knowledge about the Ring of Silvianus through the archaeologist [[Wikipedia:Mortimer Wheeler|Mortimer Wheeler]], for whom Tolkien wrote the text "[[The Name 'Nodens']]".<ref>{{webcite|author=|articleurl=http://www.lotrplaza.com/showthread.php?55657-A-Ring-with-a-Curse&p=563861#post563861|articlename=A Ring with a Curse|dated=|website=Plaza|accessed=10 April 2013}}</ref> However, Tolkien scholars [[Wayne G. Hammond]] and [[Christina Scull]] have pointed out that there is no "''evidence, or good reason to believe, that Tolkien was inspired by the Roman ring''".<ref>{{webcite|author=[[Wayne G. Hammond]], [[Christina Scull]]|articleurl=http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/mythsoc/conversations/topics/24198|articlename=Re:Tolkien and Nodens in the news this morning (message 24198)|dated=9 April 2013|website=Mythsoc|accessed=23 November 2013}}</ref>
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==Other versions of the Legendarium==
 
==Other versions of the Legendarium==
 
In order to counter the notion that ''[[The Lord of the Rings]]'' was inspired from [[wikipedia:World War II|World War II]], Tolkien himself provided a "what if" scenario in the Foreword to ''[[The Fellowship of the Ring]]'' that shows what would happen should the Ring be used against [[Sauron]]. Tolkien explained that if he had WWII in mind, then the [[Free peoples]] would enslave Sauron with the power of the Ring against him, and occupy [[Mordor]]. [[Saruman]] (whose treachery would remain secret) would then use the Ring-lore found in Mordor to create a Great Ring of his own with which to challenge the self-styled Ruler of [[Middle-earth]].<ref>{{FR|Foreword}}</ref>
 
In order to counter the notion that ''[[The Lord of the Rings]]'' was inspired from [[wikipedia:World War II|World War II]], Tolkien himself provided a "what if" scenario in the Foreword to ''[[The Fellowship of the Ring]]'' that shows what would happen should the Ring be used against [[Sauron]]. Tolkien explained that if he had WWII in mind, then the [[Free peoples]] would enslave Sauron with the power of the Ring against him, and occupy [[Mordor]]. [[Saruman]] (whose treachery would remain secret) would then use the Ring-lore found in Mordor to create a Great Ring of his own with which to challenge the self-styled Ruler of [[Middle-earth]].<ref>{{FR|Foreword}}</ref>

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