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Gothmog (balrog)

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| othernames=
 
| othernames=
 
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| position=Lord of [[Balrogs]]<br/>[[High-captain of Angband]]
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| position=Lord of [[Balrogs]], [[High-captain of Angband]]
 
| location=[[Angband]]
 
| location=[[Angband]]
 
| affiliation=[[Morgoth]]
 
| affiliation=[[Morgoth]]
 
| language=
 
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| birth=Before the [[Music of the Ainur]]
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| birth=[[Creation of the Ainur]]
 
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| deathlocation=[[Fall of Gondolin]]
 
| deathlocation=[[Fall of Gondolin]]
 
| age=
 
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| notablefor=Killed [[Fëanor]], [[Fingon]] and [[Ecthelion]]<br/>Captured [[Húrin]]<br/>Victorious in [[Nirnaeth Arnoediad]]<br/>Led the assault on [[Gondolin]]
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| notablefor=Killing [[Fëanor]], [[Fingon]] and [[Ecthelion]]<br/>Capturing [[Húrin]]<br/>Being victorious in [[Nirnaeth Arnoediad]]<br/>Leading the assault on [[Gondolin]]
 
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{{pronounce|Quenya - Osombauko.mp3|Gilgamesh}}
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{{Pronounce|Gothmog.mp3|Ardamir}}
{{pronounce|Sindarin - Gothmog.mp3|Gilgamesh}}
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'''Gothmog''' ([[Sindarin|S]], pron. {{IPA|[ˈɡoθmoɡ]}}) was the Lord of [[Balrogs]] and the [[High-captain of Angband]], one of the chief servants of the Dark Lord [[Morgoth]] with a rank equal to that of [[Sauron]].
 
'''Gothmog''' ([[Sindarin|S]], pron. {{IPA|[ˈɡoθmoɡ]}}) was the Lord of [[Balrogs]] and the [[High-captain of Angband]], one of the chief servants of the Dark Lord [[Morgoth]] with a rank equal to that of [[Sauron]].
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At the [[Dagor-nuin-Giliath]] he mortally wounded [[Fëanor]], but called a retreat upon the approach of the [[Sons of Fëanor]] with a sizable force.<ref>{{S|Flight}}</ref>  He next appeared at the [[Nirnaeth Arnoediad]], where he was also named high-captain of [[Angband]], again inferring his power and status as essentially Morgoth's right-hand Balrog ([[Sauron]], another spirit, played a more domestic than front-line role for his master).  There at the Nirnaeth he slew [[Fingon]], thus allowing him to boast of having slain two of the five [[High Kings of the Noldor]].<ref>{{S|Fifth}}</ref>  He also captured [[Húrin|Húrin Thalion]] alive in this battle on Morgoth's command, despite this order allowing Húrin to slaughter of many of Gothmog's troll-guard.<ref>{{CH|2}}</ref>{{rp|59}}
 
At the [[Dagor-nuin-Giliath]] he mortally wounded [[Fëanor]], but called a retreat upon the approach of the [[Sons of Fëanor]] with a sizable force.<ref>{{S|Flight}}</ref>  He next appeared at the [[Nirnaeth Arnoediad]], where he was also named high-captain of [[Angband]], again inferring his power and status as essentially Morgoth's right-hand Balrog ([[Sauron]], another spirit, played a more domestic than front-line role for his master).  There at the Nirnaeth he slew [[Fingon]], thus allowing him to boast of having slain two of the five [[High Kings of the Noldor]].<ref>{{S|Fifth}}</ref>  He also captured [[Húrin|Húrin Thalion]] alive in this battle on Morgoth's command, despite this order allowing Húrin to slaughter of many of Gothmog's troll-guard.<ref>{{CH|2}}</ref>{{rp|59}}
  
He was again deployed as Morgoth's front-line commander in the [[Fall of Gondolin]], where he was slain by [[Ecthelion of the Fountain|Ecthelion]].<ref>{{S|Gondolin}}</ref>  According to the (albeit uncanonical) text, Gothmog piled his iron siege equipment against the [[North Gate of Gondolin]] until it broke from sheer pressure.<ref name="III">{{LT2|III}}</ref>{{rp|176}}  The same text states that he also took a front-line position against [[Rog]], turning the tide in that part of the battle.<ref name="III"/>{{rp|179}}  More confirmed canonically, he beat down [[Tuor]] in single combat, but the elf-lord [[Ecthelion|Ecthelion of the Fountain]], who was badly wounded, rose and stood over him.  Ecthelion stood no chance against the Lord of Balrogs, and lost his sword in the brief struggle.  But then Ecthelion leaped forward, and stabbed Gothmog in the breast with the spike atop his helm.  They both fell into the [[Fountain of the King]], where Gothmog, if not already killed by the spike, drowned with his opponent.<ref name="III"/>{{rp|183-4}}
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He was again deployed as Morgoth's front-line commander in the [[Fall of Gondolin]], where he was slain by [[Ecthelion of the Fountain|Ecthelion]].<ref>{{S|Gondolin}}</ref>  According to the (albeit non-canonical) text, Gothmog piled his iron siege equipment against the [[North Gate of Gondolin]] until it broke from sheer pressure.<ref name="III">{{LT2|III}}</ref>{{rp|176}}  The same text states that he also took a front-line position against [[Rog]], turning the tide in that part of the battle.<ref name="III"/>{{rp|179}}  More confirmed canonically, he beat down [[Tuor]] in single combat, but the elf-lord [[Ecthelion|Ecthelion of the Fountain]], who was badly wounded, rose and stood over him.  Ecthelion stood no chance against the Lord of Balrogs, and lost his sword in the brief struggle.  But then Ecthelion leaped forward, and stabbed Gothmog in the breast with the spike atop his helm.  They both fell into the [[Fountain of the King]], where Gothmog, if not already killed by the spike, drowned with his opponent.<ref name="III"/>{{rp|183-4}}
 
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{{Pronounce|Gothmog.mp3|Ardamir}}
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==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
 
 
The name ''Gothmog'' is derived from the roots GOS-/GOTH- "dread", and MBAW- "compel, force, subject, oppress" (found also in the title for Morgoth "Bauglir": the tyrant or oppressor).<ref>{{LR|Etymologies}}</ref>{{rp|359, 372}}
 
The name ''Gothmog'' is derived from the roots GOS-/GOTH- "dread", and MBAW- "compel, force, subject, oppress" (found also in the title for Morgoth "Bauglir": the tyrant or oppressor).<ref>{{LR|Etymologies}}</ref>{{rp|359, 372}}
  
 
==Other versions of the legendarium==
 
==Other versions of the legendarium==
Gothmog's original name was Kalimbo.
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Gothmog's original name was ''Kalimbo''.
  
'''Kalimbo''' (also called '''Kosomot'''<ref>{{LT1|IIIn}}, p. 93</ref> or '''Kosmoko'''<ref>{{LT2|IIIn}}, p. 216</ref>) was the son of the [[Valar|Vala]] [[Morgoth|Melkor]] and the [[Ogres|ogress]] [[Fluithuin|Ulbandi]], as conceived in the earliest versions of the [[legendarium]]. Kalimbo is described as a "savage, uncivilized man, barbarian; [[Giants|giant]], monster, [[Trolls|troll]]".<ref>{{PE|14}}</ref>{{rp|12}}<ref>{{PE|12}}, entry for Kalimbo</ref> [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]] later changed his name to '''Gothmog'''.  
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'''Kalimbo''' (also called '''Kosomot'''<ref>{{LT1|IIIn}}, p. 93</ref> or '''Kosmoko'''<ref>{{LT2|IIIn}}, p. 216</ref>) was the son of the [[Valar|Vala]] [[Morgoth|Melko]] and the [[Ogres|ogress]] [[Fluithuin|Ulbandi]], as conceived in the earliest versions of the [[Legendarium]]. Kalimbo is described as a "savage, uncivilized man, barbarian; [[Giants|giant]], monster, [[Trolls|troll]]".<ref>{{PE|14}}, p. 12</ref><ref>{{PE|12}}, entry "Kalimbo"</ref> [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]] later changed his name to '''Gothmog'''.  
  
 
In the character list appended to ''[[The Fall of Gondolin (chapter)|The Fall of Gondolin]]'' Gothmog was described as "a son of Morgoth and the ogress [[Fluithuin]],"<ref>{{LT2|IIIn}}</ref>{{rp|216}} but eventually, the idea that the Valar had [[Valarindi|children]] was discarded altogether.
 
In the character list appended to ''[[The Fall of Gondolin (chapter)|The Fall of Gondolin]]'' Gothmog was described as "a son of Morgoth and the ogress [[Fluithuin]],"<ref>{{LT2|IIIn}}</ref>{{rp|216}} but eventually, the idea that the Valar had [[Valarindi|children]] was discarded altogether.
  
In one of Tolkien's early Middle-earth writings, ''[[The Lay of the Children of Húrin]]'', "Lungorthin, Lord of Balrogs" is mentioned.<ref>{{LB|1e}}</ref> It is not, however, certain if it was another name for Gothmog, or it simply meant "a Balrog lord". According to [[Christopher Tolkien]], the latter is more probable, as the name Gothmog was mentioned in the earliest Middle-earth writings, as well as the final version of Tolkien's mythology.<ref>{{LB|1e}}, Commentary on Part I of the second version</ref>
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In one of Tolkien's early Middle-earth writings, ''[[The Lay of the Children of Húrin]]'', "Lungorthin, Lord of Balrogs" is mentioned.<ref>{{LB|1e}}, p. 98</ref> It is not, however, certain if it was another name for Gothmog, or it simply meant "a Balrog lord". According to [[Christopher Tolkien]], the latter is more probable, as the name ''Gothmog'' was mentioned in the earliest writings, as well as the final version of Tolkien's mythology.<ref>{{LB|1e}}, Commentary on Part I of the second version, pp. 102-103</ref>
 
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[[Category:Evil]]
 
[[Category:Evil]]
 
[[Category:First Age characters]]
 
[[Category:First Age characters]]
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[[Category:Servants of Melkor]]
 
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[[fi:Gothmog (balrog)]]

Revision as of 14:51, 15 December 2019

This article is about the Balrog of the First Age. For the the Lieutenant of Morgul, see Gothmog (Lieutenant of Morgul).
Gothmog
Maia (Balrog)
Ted Nasmith - Fingon and Gothmog.jpg
"Fingon and Gothmog" by Ted Nasmith
Biographical Information
PositionLord of Balrogs, High-captain of Angband
LocationAngband
AffiliationMorgoth
BirthCreation of the Ainur
DeathF.A. 510
Fall of Gondolin
Notable forKilling Fëanor, Fingon and Ecthelion
Capturing Húrin
Being victorious in Nirnaeth Arnoediad
Leading the assault on Gondolin
Physical Description
RaceMaia (Balrog)
GenderMale
HeightPossibly twice man-height
WeaponryBlack axe and whip
GalleryImages of Gothmog

Gothmog (S, pron. [ˈɡoθmoɡ]) was the Lord of Balrogs and the High-captain of Angband, one of the chief servants of the Dark Lord Morgoth with a rank equal to that of Sauron.

Contents

History

Gothmog was apparently one of the Maiar that followed Melkor to exile, and because of either his brilliant mind or because of his ability to assume an immensely powerful physical form, he was made the Lord of Balrogs.

At the Dagor-nuin-Giliath he mortally wounded Fëanor, but called a retreat upon the approach of the Sons of Fëanor with a sizable force.[1] He next appeared at the Nirnaeth Arnoediad, where he was also named high-captain of Angband, again inferring his power and status as essentially Morgoth's right-hand Balrog (Sauron, another spirit, played a more domestic than front-line role for his master). There at the Nirnaeth he slew Fingon, thus allowing him to boast of having slain two of the five High Kings of the Noldor.[2] He also captured Húrin Thalion alive in this battle on Morgoth's command, despite this order allowing Húrin to slaughter of many of Gothmog's troll-guard.[3]:59

He was again deployed as Morgoth's front-line commander in the Fall of Gondolin, where he was slain by Ecthelion.[4] According to the (albeit non-canonical) text, Gothmog piled his iron siege equipment against the North Gate of Gondolin until it broke from sheer pressure.[5]:176 The same text states that he also took a front-line position against Rog, turning the tide in that part of the battle.[5]:179 More confirmed canonically, he beat down Tuor in single combat, but the elf-lord Ecthelion of the Fountain, who was badly wounded, rose and stood over him. Ecthelion stood no chance against the Lord of Balrogs, and lost his sword in the brief struggle. But then Ecthelion leaped forward, and stabbed Gothmog in the breast with the spike atop his helm. They both fell into the Fountain of the King, where Gothmog, if not already killed by the spike, drowned with his opponent.[5]:183-4

Etymology

The name Gothmog is derived from the roots GOS-/GOTH- "dread", and MBAW- "compel, force, subject, oppress" (found also in the title for Morgoth "Bauglir": the tyrant or oppressor).[6]:359, 372

Other versions of the legendarium

Gothmog's original name was Kalimbo.

Kalimbo (also called Kosomot[7] or Kosmoko[8]) was the son of the Vala Melko and the ogress Ulbandi, as conceived in the earliest versions of the Legendarium. Kalimbo is described as a "savage, uncivilized man, barbarian; giant, monster, troll".[9][10] Tolkien later changed his name to Gothmog.

In the character list appended to The Fall of Gondolin Gothmog was described as "a son of Morgoth and the ogress Fluithuin,"[11]:216 but eventually, the idea that the Valar had children was discarded altogether.

In one of Tolkien's early Middle-earth writings, The Lay of the Children of Húrin, "Lungorthin, Lord of Balrogs" is mentioned.[12] It is not, however, certain if it was another name for Gothmog, or it simply meant "a Balrog lord". According to Christopher Tolkien, the latter is more probable, as the name Gothmog was mentioned in the earliest writings, as well as the final version of Tolkien's mythology.[13]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Flight of the Noldor"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Fifth Battle: Nirnaeth Arnoediad"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Children of Húrin, "The Battle of Unnumbered Tears"
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin"
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "The Fall of Gondolin"
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "Part Three: The Etymologies"
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, "The Coming of the Valar and the Building of Valinor": "Notes and Commentary", p. 93
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "The Fall of Gondolin": "Notes and Commentary", p. 216
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Early Qenya and The Valmaric Script", in Parma Eldalamberon XIV (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, Patrick H. Wynne, and Bill Welden), p. 12
  10. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Qenyaqetsa: The Qenya Phonology and Lexicon", in Parma Eldalamberon XII (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, and Patrick H. Wynne), entry "Kalimbo"
  11. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "The Fall of Gondolin": "Notes and Commentary"
  12. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lays of Beleriand, "I. The Lay of the Children of Húrin, Second Version of the Lay: I. (Húrin and Morgoth)", p. 98
  13. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lays of Beleriand, "I. The Lay of the Children of Húrin, Second Version of the Lay: I. (Húrin and Morgoth)", Commentary on Part I of the second version, pp. 102-103